Tasmanian Oak

With a straight grain and a warm honey or pale blonde tone, Tasmanian oak is one of the most popular timbers on the market. Cost effective and readily available, its known for its incredible durability and resilience – perfect for an almost endless range of applications.

 

Warm and resilient, this timber is light in colour – straw and reddish tones feature pink and cream hues, perfect for a subtle finish that suits any space.

Known for its excellent staining qualities, Tasmanian Oak can easily be coloured or oiled to match other features and timbers throughout the home.

Range of Applications

When compared to hardwoods such as Spotted Gum or Ironbark, Tasmanian Oak is a slightly softer option. For this reason, it’s ideal for indoor use where it’s sheltered from the elements. It planes, sands, glues and finishes well – a perfect timber for flooring, panelling and high end joinery, and can even be used for interior framing.

Cost Effective Timber

If you’re looking for a hardwood timber that fits within your or your clients budget constraints, then Tasmanian Oak is the perfect choice. As a readily available material that has been used in Australian homes for many years, it’s a budget friendly option that still offers all the traditional look and feel of hardwood – you can create a luxurious space without compromise.

 

FAQs

Is your Tasmanian Oak ethically sourced?

We know that part of providing our customers with the highest quality timber means ensuring the timber is sustainably sourced. Our Tasmanian Oak is sourced from designated sustainable plantations and logged in accordance with the Australian Forestry Standards. In short, you can be confident that our Tasmanian Oak is perfect for anyone who wants to do their bit for the planet as well as use an attractive timber.

Can I use Tasmanian Oak in fire prone areas?

Whilst many people love the look and feel of hardwood timber, they are often concerned that they can’t use it within their home as they live in a bush fire prone area. Tasmanian Oak hasn’t been tested for bushfire resistance, so it may only be suitable for interior use if you live in an area where fires are a concern. For information specific to the suburb you’re building in, or recommendations of a timber that may be more suitable, speak with our team today – we’re available six days a week with friendly advice and recommendations.

Are Victorian Ash and Tasmanian Oak the same timber?

Essentially. Tasmanian Oak is the common name given to three almost identical species of eucalyptus and are almost always marketed as a single timber. Victorian, Mountain or Alpine Ash, Tasmanian Oak and Stringybark are used almost interchangeably.

What areas do you service?

Everist Timber is proud to supply our huge range of hardwood timbers to a wide area. Whether you’re in metropolitan Melbourne or the Mornington Peninsula, if you need high-quality hardwoods for any project or application, then you’ve come to the right place! Get in touch with our team to see if we service your suburb.